Nature – Images

Interesting Images

A still from a remote video camera shows two bald eagle chicks with a parent on a nest in the Angeles National Forest near Big Bear in southern California, USA.

Screen Shot 2019 05 19 at 1 28 45 PM

On a more mischievous note, an octopus has snatched a dishwashing brush during spring cleaning at the Sea Life aquarium in Timmendorfer Strand, northern Germany.

Screen Shot 2019 05 19 at 1 27 58 PM

Nature – Images

Interesting Images

Living ‘Balloon on a String’

The depths of the Indian Ocean are home to some bizarre creatures — including one that looks like a balloon on a string. Explorers captured a video of this gelatinous creature in a recent dive to the Java Trench, the bottommost part of the Indian Ocean.

Screen Shot 2019 04 18 at 1 39 52 PM

Nature – Images

Interesting Images

Swimming in the open ocean entangled this loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) in a dangerous trap posed by a discarded fishing net. Luckily, photographer Eduardo Acevedo encountered the turtle near the Canary Islands, and released her from the net after capturing this striking image.

Screen Shot 2019 02 28 at 12 29 50 PM

This tiny sea slug, the Cyerce nigra was photographed near the Philippines. This photo allows us to enjoy the visual feast of a creature too small to appreciate with the naked eye.

Screen Shot 2019 02 28 at 12 28 36 PM

Nature – Images

Interesting Images

Fireball at Yosemite

Screen Shot 2019 02 23 at 12 38 30 PM

As meltwater plunges 1,500 feet (457 meters) to the ground from the El Capitan rock formation in February, the setting sun throws its light against the falls. If the sky is clear and the sun is positioned precisely in the western sky, that setting sunlight paints the the water with fiery orange, yellow and pink light.

Dragon and Phoenix Auroras over Iceland

Screen Shot 2019 02 23 at 12 37 55 PM

Screen Shot 2019 02 23 at 12 40 32 PM

Nature – Images

Interesting Images

Sometimes, at sunset, the sun appears to suddenly and briefly change color. Blink, and you’ll miss it.

A green flash is a phenomenon in which part of the sun appears to suddenly change color for about 1 or 2 seconds. The brief flash of green light is seen more often at sunset than at sunrise.

This fleeting spectacle is caused by the refraction of sunlight, which is particularly significant at sunset and sunrise, when the light travels through more of the Earth’s atmosphere. The atmosphere bends the sunlight passing through it, separating the light into its different colors, much like a prism bends and splits sunlight into rainbows.

Screen Shot 2019 01 04 at 2 21 17 PM

Nature – Images

Interesting Images

Cute:

Screen Shot 2018 12 30 at 1 49 42 PM

This Mary River Turtle happens to be a tiny, green-mohawked turtle living in Australia.

Screen Shot 2018 12 30 at 1 51 40 PM

In November, NASA satellites caught a glimpse of arguably the most poignant possible symbol of Earth’s climate-hobbled future: A lone iceberg, shaped like a coffin, drifting into warm waters to die forever.

Screen Shot 2018 12 30 at 1 52 32 PM

Nature – Images

Interesting Images

Squirrel Knot

Five infant squirrels that got their tails caught together in a giant knot were rescued and untied by the Wisconsin Humane Society. They were taken to the group’s vets by someone who came across the bizarre scene of their tails caught in what the rescuers called a “Gordian knot” of squirrel tail and nest material. “You can imagine how wiggly and unruly (and nippy!) this frightened, distressed ball of squirrelly energy was, so our first step was to anesthetize all five of them at the same time,” the Humane Society said. The squirrels were frazzled but unharmed by the experience.

EWCOLOR

Nature – Images

Interesting Images Deadly ‘Love Vines’

Smooth, shiny balls that cling to the undersides of oak leaves often hold a grim secret inside, or, depending on how you look at it, a crunchy surprise: the dried-up corpse of a wasp, killed by a parasitic plant known as the love vine.

These tiny spheres are leaf deformities called galls — swollen tumors of leaf tissue — and their growth is caused by a type of insect called the gall wasp. These parasitic wasps house their eggs and protect their young inside the galls.

When the scientists opened galls that were in the grip of the delicate orange vines, they found wasp mummies inside; the vines had penetrated the galls and drained the insects to husks for their nutrients.