Environment

Global Temperature Extremes

The week’s hottest temperature was 112 degrees Fahrenheit (44.4 degrees Celsius) in Boulia, Queensland.

The week’s coldest temperature was minus 62.0 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 52.2 degrees Celsius) at Vostok, Antarctica.

Temperatures were tabulated from the more than 10,000 worldwide synoptic weather stations. The United Nations World Meteorological Organization sets the standards for weather observations, and provides a global telecommunications circuit for data distribution.

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Space Events

Asteroid in Close Approach to Earth

An asteroid that was only spotted on Sunday (Feb. 4) by the Catalina Sky Survey passed close by Earth yesterday. Early estimates of 2018 CB’s size range between 50 and 130 feet (15 and 40 m) in diameter. The object flew by Earth at about 5:30 p.m. EST (2:30 p.m. PST) at less than 20 percent of the distance from the Earth to the moon. That’s about 238,855 miles (384,400 km) from us. The asteroid was larger than the one that exploded over Chelyabinsk, Russia on February 15, 2013.

Environment

Global Temperature Extremes

The week’s hottest temperature was 109 degrees Fahrenheit (42.8 degrees Celsius) in Twee Riviere, South Africa.

The week’s coldest temperature was minus 60.0 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 51.1 degrees Celsius) at Verhoyansk, Siberia.

Temperatures were tabulated from the more than 10,000 worldwide synoptic weather stations. The United Nations World Meteorological Organization sets the standards for weather observations, and provides a global telecommunications circuit for data distribution.

Environment

Global Temperature Extremes

The week’s hottest temperature was 110 degrees Fahrenheit (43.3 degrees Celsius) in Moomba, South Australia.

The week’s coldest temperature was minus 55.0 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 48.3 degrees Celsius) at Batamay, Siberia.

Temperatures were tabulated from the more than 10,000 worldwide synoptic weather stations. The United Nations World Meteorological Organization sets the standards for weather observations, and provides a global telecommunications circuit for data distribution

Volcanos

Roundup of Global Volcanic Activity – New Activity for the week of 24 January – 30 January 2018

Kadovar | Papua New Guinea : RVO reported that the eruption at Kadovar continued during 23-24 January at levels similar to the previous few days. Main Crater produced light-gray to brown ash plumes that rose at most 100 m and drifted a few tens of kilometers W. Weak incandescence from Main Crater was visible at night. The lava dome at the SE Coastal Vent continued to grow and was an estimated 50 m a.s.l. (the water depth in that area was unknown) and extends out from the coast 150-200 m. The dome glowed red at night. Seismicity was low to moderate, with one high-frequency event, and 12 significant numerous small low-frequency events. Strong sulfur dioxide emissions were detected.

Kusatsu-Shiranesan | Honshu (Japan) : JMA reported that after the 23 January eruption near Motoshiranesan (the highest peak belonging to the Kusatsu-Shiranesan complex) seismicity, characterized by volcanic earthquakes and tremor, was elevated; it decreased the next day. Minor but elevated seismicity continued through 30 January, punctuated by periods of tremor. The eruption occurred from a fissure oriented E-W, located just inside the N rim of the northernmost Kagamiike Kitahi craters. JMA noted no juvenile material in the eruption deposits. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a 5-level scale).

Mayon | Luzon (Philippines) : PHIVOLCS reported that during 23-29 January there were 2-7 daily episodes of intense and sporadic lava fountaining at Mayon, each lasting 7-74 minutes. The lava fountains rose as high as 600 m above the crater rim, and fed flows in the Mi-isi and Bonga drainages and incandescent rockfalls on the summit area. Ash plumes rose 3-5 km above the crater. As many as three pyroclastic flows each day were detected by the seismic network, and had runout distances exceeding 5 km in the Buyuan drainage. Numerous rockfall events were generated by the growing and collapsing summit lava dome and traveled into the Bonga drainage, and from the front and margins of the advancing 3-km-long lava flow on the Mi-isi drainage. The Buyuan lava flow was 1 km long. Sulfur dioxide gas emissions were between 1,252 and 2,466 tonnes/day during 23-25 January. Heavy rain triggered lahars in the Binaan drainage during 28-29 January. A cycle of energetic lava effusion with sporadic lava fountaining, and pyroclastic flows from lava-collapse events, occurred late on 29 January. The events were mostly visually obscured, and indicated by seismic data. The period began with a large-volume lava collapse at 1950 at the summit crater that generated pyroclastic flows in the Mi-isi and Bonga drainages. Lava fountaining was detected at 2016 and lasted eight minutes. This was followed by large-volume lava effusion that lasted 96 minutes, and was interspersed with sporadic lava fountaining and/or pyroclastic flows. Sporadic lava fountaining was visually and seismically detected until 2306, with lava fountains rising as high as 200 m. Ash plumes rose 1.5 km above the crater. Significant ashfall was reported in Camalig and Guinobatan, Albay before 2100, possibly resulting from the lava fountaining and pyroclastic flows.

Zaozan | Honshu (Japan) : JMA reported that tremor was detected at Zaozan on 28 and 30 January, and minor inflation at the S part of the volcano was recorded. There were 12 volcanic earthquakes detected on 31 January. JMA raised the Alert level to 2 (on a 5-level scale), noting the increased potential for a small eruption.

San Miguel | El Salvador : SNET reported that during 25-26 January seismic activity at San Miguel was slightly higher than normal, with RSAM values fluctuating between 75 and 179 units. Small pulses of gas near the crater rim were visible.

Environment

Global Temperature Extremes

The week’s hottest temperature was 115 degrees Fahrenheit (46.1 degrees Celsius) in Moomba, South Australia.

The week’s coldest temperature was minus 72.0 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 57.8 degrees Celsius) at Majsk, Russia.

Temperatures were tabulated from the more than 10,000 worldwide synoptic weather stations. The United Nations World Meteorological Organization sets the standards for weather observations, and provides a global telecommunications circuit for data distribution.

Environment

Global Temperature Extremes

The week’s hottest temperature was 110 degrees Fahrenheit (43.3 degrees Celsius) in Twee Riviere, South Africa.

The week’s coldest temperature was minus 75.0 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 59.4 degrees Celsius) at Oimyakon, Siberia.

Temperatures were tabulated from the more than 10,000 worldwide synoptic weather stations. The United Nations World Meteorological Organization sets the standards for weather observations, and provides a global telecommunications circuit for data distribution.

Space Events

Big Sheets of Water Ice on Mars

Sizable deposits of water ice lurk just beneath the surface in some regions of Mars, a new study reports.

The newfound sheets appear to contain distinct layers, suggesting that studying them could shed considerable light on the Red Planet’s climate history, researchers said. And the ice is buried by just a few feet of Martian dirt in places, meaning it might be accessible to future crewed missions.

Screen Shot 2018 01 13 at 2 02 34 PM

Environment

Global Temperature Extremes

The week’s hottest temperature was 117 degrees Fahrenheit (47.2 degrees Celsius) in Penrith, Australia.

The week’s coldest temperature was minus 66.0 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 54.4 degrees Celsius) at Ostrov Kotel’nyy, Siberia.

Temperatures were tabulated from the more than 10,000 worldwide synoptic weather stations. The United Nations World Meteorological Organization sets the standards for weather observations, and provides a global telecommunications circuit for data distribution.

Space Events

Curiosity Rover Spots Weird Tube-Like Structures on Mars

NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity captured this image on Jan. 2, 2018.

Screen Shot 2018 01 07 at 12 38 11 PM

Scientists are now trying to determine whether the image shows traces of fossils or the remains of crystal structures.

It has been suggested that the angular structures look remarkably similar to Ordovician trace fossils found on Earth. Alternatively, they could be related to crystals in the rock, perhaps “crystal molds” that are also found here on Earth. Crystals in rock that are dissolved or eroded away leave crystal molds.

Another possibility is bioturbation. A common example of bioturbation is the formation of worm burrows. The burrows, once refilled with sediments, fossilized and then exposed by erosion, can end up looking very similar to structures depicted in the photograph.

Nature – Images

Interesting Images

It’s snowing iguanas in Florida. The good news is they probably aren’t dead.

As a so-called bomb cyclone continues lashing the U.S. East Coast with historic cold temperatures, weird weather abounds. In south Florida, temperatures dipped below 40 degrees Fahrenheit (4 degrees Celsius) on Jan. 3, giving Tallahassee its first measurable snowfall in 28 years. On Jan. 4, Floridians reported an even stranger sight: frozen iguana bodies falling out of trees and littering the ground around the suburbs.

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Environment

Global Temperature Extremes

The week’s hottest temperature was 114 degrees Fahrenheit (45.6 degrees Celsius) in Boulia, Queensland, Australia.

The week’s coldest temperature was minus 61.0 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 51.7 degrees Celsius) at Oimyakon, Siberia.

Temperatures were tabulated from the more than 10,000 worldwide synoptic weather stations. The United Nations World Meteorological Organization sets the standards for weather observations, and provides a global telecommunications circuit for data distribution.

Environment

Global Temperature Extremes

The week’s hottest temperature was 127 degrees Fahrenheit (52.8 degrees Celsius) in Death Valley, California.

The week’s coldest temperature was minus 111.0 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 79.4 degrees Celsius) at Vostok, Antarctica.

Temperatures were tabulated from the more than 10,000 worldwide synoptic weather stations. The United Nations World Meteorological Organization sets the standards for weather observations, and provides a global telecommunications circuit for data distribution.