Environment

Global Temperature Extremes

The week’s hottest temperature was 116.2 degrees Fahrenheit (46.7 degrees Celsius) in Mecca, Saudi Arabia.

The week’s coldest temperature was minus 102.0 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 74.4 degrees Celsius) at Vostok, Antarctica.

Temperatures were tabulated from the more than 10,000 worldwide synoptic weather stations. The United Nations World Meteorological Organization sets the standards for weather observations, and provides a global telecommunications circuit for data distribution.

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Nature – Images

Interesting Images

A massive, glowing, Slinky-like “creature” photographed by a scuba diver off the coast of Australia has spurred intense speculation about what the mystery beast could be. The translucent, glowing tube is made up of strings of squid eggs from a little-known species, a diamond squid. The diamond-shaped squid is a large and mysterious creature that can be about 3 feet (1 meter) long and weigh up to 66 lbs. (30 kilograms). The species looks a bit like a kite affixed to a handful of tentacles, and the animals live in male-female pairs for their life span (about one year). The huge sea creatures lay large egg cases up to 6 feet (1.8 m) long. Each egg case can carry between 24,100 and 43,800 eggs.

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Environment

Global Temperature Extremes

The week’s hottest temperature was 120.2 degrees Fahrenheit (49.0 degrees Celsius) in Mecca, Saudi Arabia.

The week’s coldest temperature was minus 97.0 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 71.6 degrees Celsius) at Vostok, Antarctica.

Temperatures were tabulated from the more than 10,000 worldwide synoptic weather stations. The United Nations World Meteorological Organization sets the standards for weather observations, and provides a global telecommunications circuit for data distribution.

Nature – Images

Interesting Images

Huge Jelly Blobs Spotted Off Norway Coast

Giant, jelly-like blobs have been sighted off the western coast of Norway, but the identities of these mysterious objects have scientists stumped.

The blobs are about 3.3 feet (1 meter) in diameter and are translucent, except for a strange dark streak running through their center, Science Nordic reported. No one knows what they are, or what made them.

The Norwegian blobs could be squid egg masses, but their appearance is different from any squid egg sac that has been identified before now. Researchers suggest the mystery could be solved by doing an DNA test on the jelly and compare the results to known DNA codes.

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Environment

Global Temperature Extremes

The week’s hottest temperature was 122.0 degrees Fahrenheit (50.0 degrees Celsius) in Death Valley, California.

The week’s coldest temperature was minus 101.0 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 73.9 degrees Celsius) at Vostok, Antarctica.

Temperatures were tabulated from the more than 10,000 worldwide synoptic weather stations. The United Nations World Meteorological Organization sets the standards for weather observations, and provides a global telecommunications circuit for data distribution.

Space Events

Sun Unleashes Monster Solar Flare

Early yesterday morning, the sun released two powerful solar flares — the second was the most powerful in more than a decade.

At 5:10 a.m. EDT (0910 GMT), an X-class solar flare — the most powerful sun-storm category — blasted from a large sunspot on the sun’s surface. That flare was the strongest since 2015, at X2.2, but it was dwarfed just 3 hours later, at 8:02 a.m. EDT (1202 GMT), by an X9.3 flare, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC). The last X9 flare occurred in 2006 (coming in at X9.0).

According to SWPC, the flares resulted in radio blackouts: high-frequency radio experienced a “wide area of blackouts, loss of contact for up to an hour over [the] sunlit side of Earth,” and low frequency communication, used in navigation, was degraded for an hour.

Nature – Images

Interesting Images

Atacama Desert Blooms

Chile’s Atacama Desert, one of the world’s driest places, is now flush with flowers after an unexpected rain.

The desert typically gets just 0.6 inches (15 millimeters) of rain a year. Even so, it’s earned the name “desierto florido” (flowering desert) from locals because whenever it rains enough, dormant seeds in the soil take root, and burst into a wide array of yellow, orange, green, purple and red.

These “super blooms” typically happen every five to seven years because of El Niño, a climatic cycle in the Pacific Ocean. But the last super blooms sprung up in 2015, making this one a colorful and fragrant surprise.

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Environment

Global Temperature Extremes

The week’s hottest temperature was 125.0 degrees Fahrenheit (51.7 degrees Celsius) in Death Valley, California.

The week’s coldest temperature was minus 111.0 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 79.5 degrees Celsius) at Vostok, Antarctica.

Temperatures were tabulated from the more than 10,000 worldwide synoptic weather stations. The United Nations World Meteorological Organization sets the standards for weather observations, and provides a global telecommunications circuit for data distribution.

Environment

Global Temperature Extremes

The week’s hottest temperature was 120.0 degrees Fahrenheit (48.9 degrees Celsius) in Al Qaysumah, Saudi Arabia.

The week’s coldest temperature was minus 95.0 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 70.5 degrees Celsius) at Vostok, Antarctica.

Temperatures were tabulated from the more than 10,000 worldwide synoptic weather stations. The United Nations World Meteorological Organization sets the standards for weather observations, and provides a global telecommunications circuit for data distribution.

Space Events

Large Asteroid to pass Earth in September

An asteroid called Florence will pass within 4.5 million miles of Earth on Sept. 1, NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory announced in a Thursday press release.

That’s 18 times the distance from the Earth to the moon. If that doesn’t sound impressive, consider its size: At 2.7 miles, Florence is the largest asteroid to pass Earth since NASA began tracking near-Earth asteroids. And this particular asteroid won’t come this close again until 2500, NASA says.

Environment

Global Temperature Extremes

The week’s hottest temperature was 121.0 degrees Fahrenheit (49.4 degrees Celsius) in Al Qaysumah, Saudi Arabia.

The week’s coldest temperature was minus 103.0 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 75.0 degrees Celsius) at Vostok, Antarctica.

Temperatures were tabulated from the more than 10,000 worldwide synoptic weather stations. The United Nations World Meteorological Organization sets the standards for weather observations, and provides a global telecommunications circuit for data distribution.

Environment

Global Temperature Extremes

The week’s hottest temperature was 122.0 degrees Fahrenheit (50.0 degrees Celsius) in Al Qaysumah, Saudi Arabia.

The week’s coldest temperature was minus 98.0 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 72.2 degrees Celsius) at Vostok, Antarctica.

Temperatures were tabulated from the more than 10,000 worldwide synoptic weather stations. The United Nations World Meteorological Organization sets the standards for weather observations, and provides a global telecommunications circuit for data distribution.

Environment

Death Valley Breaks Record for Hottest Month Ever in the US

July temperatures in Death Valley have incinerated previous records.

With an average daily high temperature of 107.4 degrees Fahrenheit (41.9 degrees Celsius), July was the valley’s hottest month on record, blazing through the former record of 107.2 degrees F (41.8 degrees C) set in 1917.

Temperatures in Death Valley in July blazed into the record books not only as the hottest month in the desert valley in eastern California but also as the hottest month ever recorded in the United States.

During July, temperatures were at their lowest at around 5 a.m. local time, averaging about 95 degrees F (35 degrees C).

Death Valley’s highest temperatures during July were 127 degrees F (52.8 degrees C) on July 7; 126 degrees F (52.2 degrees C) on July 8; and 125 degrees F (51.7 degrees C) on July 31,