Earthquakes

Magnitude 5+ Earthquakes – Global

5.6 earthquake hits the Bougainville region, Papua New Guinea.

5.2 earthquake hits the Molucca Sea.

5.2 earthquake hits the Kermedec Islands.

5.1 earthquake hits offshore Chiapas, Mexico.

5.0 earthquake hits Vanuatu.

5.0 earthquake hits Taiwan.

5.0 earthquake hits south of the Kermedec Islands.

5.0 earthquake hits Halmahera, Indonesia.

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Storms and Floods

Tropical Storms – Roundup of Tropical Storms:

In the Atlantic Ocean: Tropical Storm Barry is located about 95 mi…155 km sw of the mouth of the Mississippi river and about 125 mi…205 km sse of Morgan City Louisiana with maximum sustained winds…50 mph…85 km/h. Present movement…wnw or 295 degrees at 5 mph…7 km/h.

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NewsBytes:

China – The heaviest average rainfall to lash a swathe of southern and eastern China in more than half a century brought torrential rain and floods, destroying houses, damaging crops and forcing the evacuation of nearly 80,000 people, state media said.

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA – Torrential downpours turned roads into rivers and triggered landslides on Thursday, blocking access to a hospital for several hours and forcing the evacuation of a preschool when a sinkhole opened up.

Bangladesh – The monsoon floods in Cox’s Bazar this week are threatening the already precarious existence of the refugees seeking shelter there. undreds of makeshift homes have already collapsed after landslides occurred on the muddy hillsides around the camps. About 4,000 families have been affected, many of whom have been moved to temporary shelters.

Wildlife

Arctic Voyager

An Arctic fox was tracked by Norwegian researchers as it wandered on foot for 2,737 miles from northern Norway to northern Greenland, then finally into Canada’s far north. They say it is one of the longest treks ever recorded for an Arctic fox.

A tracking device put on the animal in July 2017 allowed a team from the Norwegian Polar Institute to follow the now 2-year-old female as it moved across vast stretches of sea ice and glaciers.

The animal traveled an average of about 29 miles each day for 76 days. But at times, she walked nearly 100 miles in a single day.

No other of the species tracked by the institute wandered beyond Norway.

Cat Killers

When cats roam free, small wild animals die. And the body count in Australia exceeds 2 billion native animals per year.

Environmental researchers in Australia compiled the alarming figure by combing through hundreds of studies on the predatory habits of Australia’s free-ranging pet cats as well as feral felines.

In just one day, Australia’s millions of cats kill approximately 1.3 million birds, 1.8 million reptiles and over 3.1 million mammals.

Cats were introduced to Australia in the 18th century by European colonizers, and a report in 2017 found that feral cats could be found in 99.8% of the continent, including on 80% of Australia’s islands.

Current estimates of the number of feral cats in Australia range from about 2 million to more than 6 million during years with a lot of rainfall, when prey is abundant. And every feral cat kills about 740 native animals annually

Environment

Superweeds

Weeds around the world are evolving resistance to numerous herbicides, which researchers warn will have economic and environmental consequences once no weed killers will work on them anymore.

“It is not a matter of if but when we are going to be losing chemical control of these weeds,” says Adam Davis of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Davis adds that once control is lost, the superweeds will cause massive crop losses and increased food prices. The weeds could also exacerbate climate change as even more native landscapes are turned into farmland to make up for the crop losses.

But researchers say resistance can be prevented by rotating different ways of weed control so there is no chance to evolve resistance to any one method.

Environment

Global Temperature Extremes

The week’s hottest temperature was 122 degrees Fahrenheit (50.0 degrees Celsius) in El Golea, Algeria.

The week’s coldest temperature was minus 98.0 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 72.2 degrees Celsius) at Russia’s Vostok base, Antarctica.

Temperatures were tabulated from the more than 10,000 worldwide synoptic weather stations. The United Nations World Meteorological Organization sets the standards for weather observations, and provides a global telecommunications circuit for data distribution.

Disease

Syphilis – Europe

Syphilis cases have soared in Europe over the past decade and become, for the first time since the early 2000s, more common in some countries than new cases of HIV, health experts said on Friday.

Reported cases of the sexually transmitted disease are up by 70% since 2010, a report from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) showed – with the rise driven by more unprotected sex and riskier sexual behaviour among gay men.

Monkeypox – NIgeria

Since 2017, Nigeria has been experiencing the largest documented outbreak of human monkeypox caused by the West African clade of the virus, with some evidence of secondary human-to-human transmission, according to a newly published clinical and epidemiological report. More than 300 cases have been reported in the outbreak as of April 2019, according to the CDC.

African Swine Fever – China

China confirmed a new outbreak of African swine fever in Hubei province, the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs said on Thursday. The disease, which kills almost all pigs it infects, occurred on a farm of 102 pigs in Tuanfeng county in the east of the province.

Volcanos

Global Volcanic Activity – Ongoing Activity for the week of 3 July – 9 July 2019

Aira | Kyushu (Japan) : JMA reported that at 1044 on 4 July an explosion at Minamidake crater (at Aira Caldera’s Sakurajima volcano) generated an ash plume that rose 3.2 km above the crater rim and ejected material 1.1 km from the vent. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a 5-level scale).

Asosan | Kyushu (Japan) : JMA reported that minor explosive events on 4 and 5 July at Asosan’s Nakadake Crater ejected sediment from the vent. Sulfur dioxide emissions were 1,300 tons per day on 5 July. The Alert Level remained at 2 (on a scale of 1-5).

Asosan | Kyushu (Japan) : JMA reported that minor explosive events on 4 and 5 July at Asosan’s Nakadake Crater ejected sediment from the vent. Sulfur dioxide emissions were 1,300 tons per day on 5 July. The Alert Level remained at 2 (on a scale of 1-5).

Colima | Mexico : Centro Universitario de Estudios e Investigaciones de Vulcanologia – Universidad de Colima reported that intermittent steam-and-gas emissions, mainly from the NE side of the crater, and three small explosions were recorded during 29 June-5 July. A thermal camera located S of the volcano recorded thermal anomalies associated with emissions. Weather conditions sometimes prevented observations of the crater.

Dukono | Halmahera (Indonesia) : Based on satellite and wind model data, and notices from PVMBG, the Darwin VAAC reported that during 3-9 July ash plumes from Dukono rose to altitudes of 1.8-2.1 km (6,000-7,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted in multiple directions. The Alert Level remained at 2 (on a scale of 1-4), and the public was warned to remain outside of the 2-km exclusion zone.

Ebeko | Paramushir Island (Russia) : Volcanologists in Severo-Kurilsk (Paramushir Island), about 7 km E of Ebeko, observed explosions during 28 June-5 July that sent ash plumes up to 4.5 km (14,800 ft) a.s.l. The plumes drifted in multiple directions. A thermal anomaly was visible in satellite images on 29 June and 1 July. The Aviation colour Code remained at Orange (the second highest level on a four-colour scale).

Ibu | Halmahera (Indonesia) : The Darwin VAAC reported that on 6 July an ash plume from Ibu rose to 2.1 km (7,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted N, based on satellite images and weather models. An intermittent thermal anomaly was also visible. The Alert Level remained at 2 (on a scale of 1-4), and the public was warned to stay at least 2 km away from the active crater, and 3.5 km away on the N side.

Karymsky | Eastern Kamchatka (Russia) : KVERT reported that a thermal anomaly over Karymsky was identified in satellite images during 30 June-3 July. The Aviation colour Code remained at Orange (the second highest level on a four-colour scale).

Klyuchevskoy | Central Kamchatka (Russia) : KVERT reported that a weak thermal anomaly over Klyuchevskoy was visible in satellite images during 1-3 July, and ash plumes drifted as far as 85 km E and SE during 1-2 July. The Aviation colour Code remained at Orange (the second highest level on a four-colour scale).

Krakatau | Indonesia : PVMBG reported that Anak Krakatau’s seismic network recorded eight eruptive events during 1-7 July. The events were not followed by visible ash emissions, though observations were hindered by weather conditions. The Alert Level remained at 2 (on a scale of 1-4), and the public was warned to remain outside of the 2-km radius hazard zone from the crater.

Merapi | Central Java (Indonesia) : PVMBG reported that during 28 June-4 July the lava-dome volume at Merapi did not significantly change and was an estimated 475,000 cubic meters, based on analyses of drone images taken on 4 July. Extruded lava fell into the upper parts of the SE flank, generating one block-and-ash flow that traveled 1.1 km down the Gendol drainage on 1 July. White plumes rose as high as 200 m above the summit. The Alert Level remained at 2 (on a scale of 1-4), and residents were warned to remain outside of the 3-km exclusion zone.

Nevados de Chillan | Chile : ONEMI and SERNAGEOMIN reported that an explosive event at Nevados de Chillán’s Nicanor Crater recorded at 0550 on 9 July was associated with a long-period earthquake signal. The explosion ejected incandescent material onto areas near the crater. The Alert Level remained at Orange, the second highest level on a four-colour scale, and residents were reminded not to approach the crater within 3 km. ONEMI maintained an Alert Level Yellow (the middle level on a three-colour scale) for the communities of Pinto, Coihueco, and San Fabián.

Sangay | Ecuador : IG reported that a new eruption at Sangay began on 7 May and was continuing as of 3 July. Activity was concentrated at two eruptive centers: the Central Crater and the Ñuñurcu dome (located 190 m SSE of Central Crater). Sporadic explosions at Central Crater produced ash plumes that rose as high as 1.1 km above the crater rim and drifted W and SW. The Ñuñurcu dome fed at least three lava flows that traveled down the SE flank. Collapses of the lava-flow fronts generated small pyroclastic flows and numerous block flows that traveled as far as 3,888 m elevation. Staff of the Parque Nacional Sangay observed atypical sedimentation consisting of volcanic material at the confluence of the Upano River and its tributary, the Volcán River, 23 km SE of the summit. Areas of steaming in the Volcán River were possibly from hot blocks originating from the volcano. Residents of Macas (42 km SSE) reported increased turbidity in the Upano from pyroclastic material.

Sangeang Api | Indonesia : The Darwin VAAC reported that during 4-5 July ash plumes from Sangeang Api were visible in satellite images rising to 2.1-2.3 km (7,000-8,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifting SW and W. During 6-9 July multiple ash plumes rose to 3-4.6 km (10,000-15,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted N, NW, and SW. Thermal anomalies were visible on 4 and 8 July.

Sheveluch | Central Kamchatka (Russia) : KVERT reported that a thermal anomaly over Sheveluch’s lava dome was identified daily in satellite images during 28 June-5 July. The Aviation colour Code remained at Orange (the second highest level on a four-colour scale).